sharks

A Giant Shark Glowing In The Dark, Found 1000 Feet Below The Ocean

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Many creatures living in the deep ocean are known to glow in the dark. Now, for the first time, marine scientists have found a giant bright shark. The Ritchers spotted a Kitefun shark on the east coast of New Zealand that has the ability to self-glow (bioluminescence). This shark can grow up to six feet long and remains 984 feet below sea level.

New discoveries about it have made it the largest vertebrate (vertebrate organism) to shine. Where this shark life is called the Twilight Zone of the ocean. It goes to 3,200 feet below the sea and there is no light here. The study has found that because they live in such a dark place, there is no place for them to hide.

Why do these sharks shine

She uses the glow of her body for camouflage which is a way to hide by looking like a shiny surface of the water. Scientists believe that slow-floating sharks use it to catch their prey swimmers so that they can sneak in and attack.

Shine due to chemical

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science, was jointly conducted by scientists from Belgium and New Zealand who discovered it in January 2020 and published its results on 26 February. This species has already been identified but bioluminescence potential has been observed for the first time. It is also called living light or cold light. The chemical luciferin present in the fish causes it to glow. Scientists say that this ability certainly plays a big role in our planet’s largest ecosystem.

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