China education reforms: Law passed to reduce homework pressure on students

Read Time:1 Minute, 58 Second

China has passed a new law to cut down on students’ homework and off-school tutoring, seeking to strike a balance between academics, rest and physical education, local media reported on Saturday.

The new law seems to be part of Beijing’s broader efforts to exercise stricter controls over Chinese citizens’ personal and social lives including limiting the time youngsters spend playing video games.

The new law “…stipulates that parents or other guardians of minors shall be responsible for family education, while the state, schools and society provide guidance, support and services for family education”, the Xinhua news agency reported on Saturday.

It was passed at a meeting of China’s parliament, the National People’s Congress (NPC), on Saturday.

The full details of the law are yet to be published.

“In response to the country’s drive to ease the academic workload of young students, the law requires local governments at or above the county level to take steps to reduce the burden of excessive homework and off-campus tutoring in compulsory education,” the Xinhua report said.

The law bans parents from placing excessive academic burden on their children, stating the guardians of minors should appropriately organise children’s time for study, rest, recreation and physical exercise.

Parents are also required to play their part in preventing their children from becoming addicted to the internet, the new law said.

The NPC said on October 18 that it would consider legislation to punish parents if their young children exhibit “very bad behaviour” or commit crimes.

According to the guidelines on the new law released earlier, the changes aim to promote the healthy development of students, improve education quality, alleviate financial burdens on parents, and institute law-based governance of the education sector.

“The changes focus on education in core subjects, or compulsory education, which refers to grades K-9, covering the ages of approximately 6-15 years,” according to the Beijing-based consultancy firm, Dezan Shira & Associates.

China’s education ministry in recent months has limited video gaming hours for minors, allowing them to play online for one hour only on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

A notice issued by the National Press and Publication Administration on August 30 said online game providers can only offer one-hour services to minors from 8-9 pm on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.

source: Hindutan times

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %