Why Spaced Repetition Is the Best Way to Learn

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If you’re like most people, you probably think of learning as something that happens in a straight line. You learn something new, and then you forget it over time. But what if there were a better way? Spaced repetition is the best way to learn. It lets you remember what you’ve learned, curbing the forgetting curve and helping you learn faster than ever before. 

Spaced repetition is a learning technique that helps you remember what you’ve learned. It’s based on the idea that we forget things over time and that by spacing out our learning, we can help ourselves remember things for longer periods. Spaced repetition helps you learn faster because it helps you remember what you’ve learned.

The Ebbinghaus Forgetting Curve

The Ebbinghaus forgetting curve is a graph that shows how well we remember things over time. The shape of the curve is pretty much like what you’d expect. At first, we remember everything, but soon after, we forget most of it. But then, after a while, we regain some memory of what we’ve learned.

The graph is called the “forgetting curve” because it makes it look like our memories are decaying over time (kinda like mold or something). But the point is that if we learn something new and then repeat it enough times, our ability to recall it will eventually increase.

This is called spaced repetition – the idea that if you practice something often enough in quick enough intervals, your brain will be able to retain more information over time.

The Classic Cramming Method Isn’t as Effective as You Might Think

The classic cramming method can indeed lead to a false sense of security. You might think you’re learning quickly and efficiently, but in reality, you’re putting yourself at a disadvantage.

When you study in a rush without any breaks, your memory is forced to try to keep up with the workload being thrown at it. It has no time to process what it’s learned or make connections between different pieces of information. The brain needs time off from studying so that it can connect the dots later on. 

Cramming affects not just the perpetrator’s conduct but also his family, peers, environment, and future. Cramming also leads to stress and anxiety, which have been shown in multiple studies as impediments to effective learning. In addition, cramming tends to lead to a lack of motivation. A lack of motivation may also cause us to forget what we’ve learned and also to stop trying altogether. That means no more studying. All told, cramming prevents understanding and retention by rushing through material too quickly for our brains’ liking.

Spaced Repetition Works in the Classroom

So far, we’ve been talking about how spaced repetition works for adults looking to improve their memory on their own. But what about when it comes to the classroom?

Spaced repetition can be used in the classroom to help students learn and retain information. As students get more familiar with what they’re learning, spaced repetition helps them remember facts, names, and definitions better. It also helps them learn faster by decreasing the number of times it takes them to get something right.

For example, the Proprep STEM learning courses are designed in short easy to understand videos. It has been seen that this is the optimal way of learning for students, and they can retain more information than they otherwise could. 

Spacing Out Your Learning Helps Improve Your Long-Term Memory

Spaced repetition is a learning strategy that helps you retain and recall information. It has been proven to be one of the most effective methods for long-term memory retention. Spacing out your learning allows you to spend more time reviewing material you’ve already learned. This makes it easier for your brain to access the information later when you need it.

Spaced repetition involves learning something new, then practicing saying it aloud or writing it down several times over weeks (usually around five). This is followed by another review session further in the future before going back and repeating this process again and again until the information has become ingrained in your mind. This method makes use of several principles that make recall easier.

  • Repetition: Repeating new information over time strengthens new pathways in your brain
  • Forgetting: Forgetting serves as an important part of long-term memory formation. If we didn’t forget things we learned, they would quickly become crowded out by newer memories.
  • Rehearsal: According to Jennifer E. Ashton, University of York, memories fade with time.  However, practicing learned material might aid with memory. Restudy and retrieval practice are two rehearsing procedures that may be used to commit new knowledge to memory. Rehearsing knowledge helps lock it into place.

There’s a Key to How Often You Do It

Repetition is a cornerstone of learning. And the most effective way to learn something is by doing it over and over again until you’ve internalized the information. But there’s a key factor in how often you repeat something. Spacing out your repetition helps improve your long-term memory and retention.

Spacing out your repetitions can be as simple as taking breaks between study sessions or even just writing down what you’re trying to memorize on paper so that when you come back later. It will be fresh in your mind again without having to go through the process of rereading the same material.

We All Forget Things

We all forget things. It’s a fact of life that happens to the best of us, but there’s good news. You aren’t alone in this. Everyone forgets stuff, and there are some great reasons why that happens.

That said, no one is going to be able to remember everything forever. And sometimes, forgetting things can be frustrating, especially if you’re trying to learn something new or important. But don’t worry. Learning new stuff isn’t always easy and will often feel like an uphill battle at times. That’s normal. 

The good news is that forgetting things isn’t necessarily bad. It has some pretty cool benefits for learning in general. We make innumerable memories during our lives, yet many of them are forgotten. Why? Contrary to popular belief, ‘forgetting’ may not be a terrible thing, according to researchers at Trinity College, who believe it may represent a type of learning.

How Often Should You Study?

The answer: It depends on your goals.

For example, if you’re trying to learn a new language or memorize facts for a test, you might want to space out your study sessions over several days or weeks. This will make sure you don’t forget anything as soon as the exam is over. It will also allow you time to practice what you’ve learned before moving on to the next topic. If you have trouble remembering things after a long time, this might be a good strategy for you.

On the other hand, if you’re trying to learn something that requires quick recall, like how to play piano or drive a stick shift, you’ll probably benefit from studying more often. The more often you practice something, the better you’ll get at it. So if there’s an opportunity for extra practice, like driving a stick shift in an empty parking lot, take advantage of it.

It’s not easy to make the time for learning. But if you do, spaced repetition can help you remember what you’ve learned and even learn faster. It’s a powerful tool that can make all the difference in your ability to retain information. So try out these tips for yourself, and see how they work.

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