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What’s New About The ITIL 4 Framework

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Introduction 

With the release of the ITIL 4 Foundation, many businesses that use ITIL — are probably wondering, what is new and better? The answer is that the new ITIL 4 framework has the potential to become the next most used framework on the market, propelling businesses to operate at their greatest potential. Under the new ITIL 4, there are many familiar terms that continue to be used, like service providers, risks, and stakeholders — but there is a renewed emphasis on value, which is indispensable when running a business of your own. In this article, we will go through the new principles and dimensions associated with adopting ITIL 4 and getting ITIL certification which we hope will help you to better make the choice of whether to shift to using the new and improved framework. 

What Is Different About ITIL 4: The Principles

With the focus on value, there is a need to understand the proper meaning of service management — which is the group of specialized capabilities an organization provides in the arena of customer-oriented services. Value is then found and defined within a bidirectional relationship, creating value in tandem. Value depends on how the customer experiences the process, and thus ITIL 4 focuses on the grand change to customer experience (CX) rather than on providing services that have been expected from older ITIL iterations, which is in line with how the ITIL framework prioritizes service management above all else. 

Another shift in focus is the change from processes to accomplishing outcomes. Especially accounting for value, it is important to realize that realizing outcomes must bring value. In order to achieve this outcome, one must focus also on service relationships, which in turn sees a huge emphasis on collaboration. 

The ITIL 4 has new guiding principles that help guide an organization through every possible scenario, which makes the new framework much more practical than it ever was before.

The first of these principles is the emphasis on value — which accounts for how value depends on the customer’s perception, and this in turn is dependent on CX and user experience. 

The second principle is for organizations to start where they are — and not just simply discard everything they have built for themselves, but to carefully examine their strengths and weaknesses, keep the working mechanisms and adjust accordingly where things do not work. 

The third principle of the new framework is to progress iteratively according to feedback and to embrace agility by improving large-scale projects gradually in small steps and as such actively searching for feedback. 

The fourth principle is to cooperate and propagate visibility — as organizations ought to work everywhere with everyone — ranging from service providers to customers or developers, and to always remember that collaborations do not equal agreement, and those good choices are made only when data is transparent and clear. 

The fifth principle is to think and work comprehensively, and organizations can achieve this by trying to make a careful move towards the entire effort that encourages other organizational arms to deliver value. 

The sixth principle is to ensure your organization’s efforts remain accessible and practical. This is especially important as organizations should always try to be transparent and functional, and as such, this entails businesses never covering anything — this could mean that there is a need to make specific rules to manage exceptions to standard case protocol. 

Last but not least, the seventh principle dictates that one should learn to maximize and automate and do so wherever one can, as long as it does not result in a poorer customer experience. 

The above principles have a broad and far-reaching focus in the realm of organizational collaboration, which is what organizations should always value when operating their respective businesses. 

New Dimensions

Aside from these principles, the ITIL 4 also introduces two new dimensions to its existing four dimensions. Previously, the ITIL only had people, processes, tools, and the institution of value series, but the ITIL 4 is now looking to add partners and suppliers. The addition of these dimensions shows the reality that organizations are facing now — having to outsource an ever-increasing number of things that are critical to businesses. Value streams remain familiar to every organization or individual and healthy guidelines are implemented for uninterrupted improvement based on past foundations. 

The new ITIL 4 framework will also use the ITIL service value chain, which will cover how all subparts and activities of an organization work in tandem to kickstart value creation. The service value chain lies at the center of this service value system, which analyzes the activities — which include planning, improving, engaging, designing and transitioning, obtaining and building, and delivering and supporting. These activities are not necessarily linear, especially considering the use of the ‘progress iteratively’ approach in the guiding principles, which emphasizes the repetitive nature of the set of activities. 

The ITIL 4 framework also incorporates 34 practices, which, when divided into the three categories of general, service, and technical management, will substitute the 26 processes in the older iteration of the ITIL framework. These new practices will take into account all four dimensions of service management — associates and providers, organizations and people, value streams and procedures, and information and technology. The incorporation of new practices should make the flow of things more accessible — practical and simpler to learn from — than previous iterations of the ITIL framework, or at the very least help you to implement parts of it into your organization. 

Conclusion

In conclusion, there is much change to expect from the new ITIL 4 framework. Just as how organizations should adapt to their environment, the ITIL 4 framework keeps every essential good thing and has added improved elements to help organizations achieve their most efficient state, all whilst focusing on important values like customer experience, which is frankly indispensable in today’s workforce. While previous iterations of the ITIL might have been too theoretical for some, the new ITIL framework is flexible, practical, and accessible to all, which is why organizations that currently use older iterations of ITIL should seriously consider upgrading to the new framework. 

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